WVU Bluegrass & Old Time Bands, Buck Mountain String Band to Perform at PSC Feb. 28th

West Virginia University’s Bluegrass and Old Time Bands

West Virginia University’s Bluegrass and Old Time Bands will perform on the Potomac State College Campus, in Keyser, W.Va., Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 7 p.m., in the Church-McKee Arts Center. This event is free and open to the public. Pictured from left are WVU Students Sydney Scott, Staci Pritt, John McCauley, Niko Kreider, Amelia Welsh, Tristan Dennis, and Milo Levine.


Buck Mountain String Band

Buck Mountain String Band, a group of musicians from Hampshire County, W.Va. will open for WVU’s Bluegrass and Old Time Bands that will be performing at Potomac State College, Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 7 p.m., in the Church-McKee Arts Center. This event is open and free to the public. Many of the musicians in the Buck Mountain String Band play homemade instruments. 


Mountain music will fill the air when Potomac State College of West Virginia University hosts a concert featuring the WVU Bluegrass and Old Time Bands Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 7 p.m., in the Church-McKee Arts Center. The bands are under the direction of Travis Stimeling, Ph.D., assistant professor of music history in the WVU School of Music.

Opening for WVU’s bands will be Buck Mountain String Band, a group of musicians from Hampshire County, W.Va., who play traditional Appalachian music. The group gets together on a regular basis in an 1800's cabin without electricity and plays tunes even older than the cabin. Several of the regulars play homemade instruments. Keeping this music alive and passing it on to younger folks is what this group loves to do. The band is under the direction of Jim Morris.

This event is free and open to the public.

The WVU Bluegrass and Old-Time Bands were formed in the fall of 2014 and have two primary purposes. They provide venues in which WVU students can learn about the rich traditions of Appalachian traditional music and explore their own creative voices within those traditions. They also serve as musical ambassadors for the university, performing throughout the state.

“When I was a student growing up in West Virginia, I remember hearing well-meaning teachers tell me that the traditional culture that I loved was something I should be embarrassed by and I should hide,” Dr. Stimeling said. “It’s my hope that the WVU Bluegrass and Old-Time bands can encourage West Virginia’s young people to celebrate their Appalachian identities and to stay here and make a positive difference in their communities.”

All bands performing that evening will feature sounds and instruments of Appalachia presenting a wide-range of Appalachian musical practices, including ballad singing, old-time fiddling, dance calling, and bluegrass.

Local artisans will be set up in the lobby prior to the show.  Morris, with the Buck Mountain String Band, makes instruments from cigar boxes, tins and other found objects. Musician Noah Cline, a current Potomac State student, plays and makes gourd banjos. 

The WVU Bluegrass and Old-Time Bands have received financial support from the Foundation for Bluegrass Music, Inc., the WVU College of Creative Arts, and the WVU School of Music, as well as private donations.